Gettin' festy - Page 3

Summer in the Bay means music festival season — hold on to your butts (and your wallets)

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JJAAXXNN at Hickey Fest.
PHOTO BY GINGER FIERSTIEN

"I think at smaller festivals you have more people who take the time to really listen, appreciate the music more, really big fans," he says. "There are fewer artists on this bill [than at large festivals] but they're all great ones — I'm especially excited to see Wye Oak."

Maramag will be debuting some songs from his new album, Tangerine Sky, out June 3; the show will serve as a welcome-home from a quick national tour to promote it.

Then there are the even more modest summer offerings, like SF Popfest, which takes place over four days (May 22-25) at various small venues in the city. It's not exactly a traditional festival — you're not likely to find slideshows online of the "BEST POPFEST FASHION!!1!" the way we've unfortunately become accustomed to from Coachella — but for the small contingent of super passionate '90s indie-pop fans in the Bay Area (hi!), this is one not to miss.

"I've been getting a lot of calls from people who think it's a very different kind of festival than it is. App people. This one guy had some kind of offer about a parking app for festivals, I think? Which would really not make any sense at all," says Josh Yule, guitarist for SF jangle-pop maestros Cruel Summer, who received the mantle of SF Popfest organizer from his predecessor in the mid-aughts (older history of the festival is a little hazy, as it's always been primarily organized by musicians for musicians — for fun and, says Yule, absolutely no profit whatsoever). There was talk of getting some beer sponsors at some point, but he decided against it. "We have friends working the door at most of these things. I was a punk kid in high school, I guess, I tend to stay away from things that would make this go in a more corporate direction."

This year's fest is centered around reunions of bands who've been broken up for a while, like cult-favorite Sacramento popsters Rocketship, who haven't played together in at least a decade; the band will be at the Rickshaw Stop Fri/23 for a Slumberland Records showcase. Dressy Bessy, Dreamdate, the Mantles, Terry Malts, and plenty others will all make appearances throughout the fest, as well as a few newer bands, like the female-fronted Stockton garagey-punk band Monster Treasure.

"Obviously it's not gonna be thousands of people, it's not going to be outside — it's going to be 100 to 200 like-minded individuals who all enjoy the same thing, and they all get it," says Yule. "We got these bands back together to play and they're all excited about it even though there's no [financial] guarantee...It's that community that I've always been involved in and sometimes I feel like it's not around anymore. So it's nice to go 'Oh wait, there it is. It's still there, and it's still strong.'"

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