Guardian Editorial

Listen to the Guardian's endorsement interviews

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Our endorsements for the June election hit the streets in this week's Bay Guardian, in newsstands now. But although we do explain the reasoning behind our endorsement decisions on the printed page, in interest of transparency we're letting readers hear directly from the people behind the two hottest races: the Assembly race between David Campos and David Chiu, and the waterfront height measure Prop. B. Read more »

SF's culture of corruption

In many ways, San Francisco hasn't changed. It's still the old Barbary Coast, ruled by capitalist thugs and corrupt politicians, only with glossy modern spin

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EDITORIAL The extent of the charges in the criminal complaint against Sen. Leland Yee, political consultant Keith Jackson, and others are shocking and sensational: international arms trafficking, drug dealing, money laundering, cavorting with organized crime figures, murder for hire. But the basic allegation that Yee and Jackson practiced a corrupt, transactional kind of politics wasn't surprising to anyone who knew how they operated.Read more »

Jesus was a socialist

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EDITORIAL Christmas Day, here in the city of St. Francis, seems like a fine time to look at Jesus Christ, what he advocated, and what his legacy is today. Because this traditionally Catholic city has temples filled with crass money changers these days, and a mistaken elevation of "the market" to almost divine status — developments that are antithetical to everything the Bible teaches about Jesus.Read more »

Controlling big money campaigns

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Thanks to the U. S. Supreme Court, it's almost impossible to regulate the so-called independent expenditure committees.

EDITORIAL Big money moved into the district supervisorial races this fall. Downtown forces, working with landlords and a labor union that wants a giant new hospital on Van Ness Avenue, are pouring hundreds of thousands of dollars into races in Districts 6, 8, and 10, trying to alter the direction of the board by electing more conservative candidates. And while district races allow grassroots candidates without huge war chests a decent shot at winning, all this cash is going to have an impact — and might prove to be decisive in some races. Read more »

A public power landmark -- and the battle to come

CCA allows communities to offer an alternative — to buy cleaner power in bulk and resell it at comparable or cheaper rates to residents and businesses

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EDITORIAL It's been 97 years since Congress passed a landmark law mandating public power in San Francisco, 67 years since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the city was violating the law by allowing Pacific Gas and Electric Co. to operate a private monopoly in town, and 42 years since the Guardian first broke the story of the Raker Act scandal and launched a campaign to bring public power to the city. And now, even operating under a tight PG&E-imposed deadline, the San Francisco is moving very close to establishing a modest type of public power.Read more »

Russoniello has to go

A holdover from a discredited administration is still running the Justice Department in one of the most liberal parts of the United States
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EDITORIAL When you look behind the problems San Francisco has had with its sanctuary city policy — the arrest and threatened deportation of kids as young as 15, the threats to city officials trying to protect juveniles, the threats to the new policy Sup. David Campos won approval for — there's one major figure lurking: U.S. Attorney Joe Russoniello.

He's the same one who was behind the raids on medical marijuana clubs. He's a Republican whose former law firm, Cooley, Godward, gets hefty legal fees from representing Pacific Gas and Electric Co. Read more »

Don't rush the Candlestick EIR

One of the few times that the Planning Commission and Board of Supervisors will get to weigh in on the biggest land-use decision facing San Francisco today
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EDITORIAL The Candlestick Point redevelopment project is by far the biggest land-use decision facing San Francisco today, and one of the most significant in the city's modern history. The project, sponsored by Lennar Corp., would bring 10,500 housing units and 24,000 additional residents to the area. Those residents would need new schools, playgrounds, open space, and transportation systems. Industrial and commercial development would create some 3,500 permanent jobs, and those people would need ways to get to work. Read more »

US out of Afghanistan

After the biggest disappointment yet of his young presidency, it's more important than ever for the movement that swept Obama into office to get back into the streets
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We knew President Obama wasn't going to be perfect. We knew he was a lot more of a political moderate than the left — which was about getting rid of George W. Bush and voting for a candidate who was against the war in Iraq — always wanted to acknowledge. Read more »

Time for serious budget reform

It's time to quit with the patches, quit with the one-time solutions and fee hikes
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EDITORIAL Rahm Emanuel, President Obama's chief of staff, likes to say that politicians should never let a crisis go to waste — but that's what happened in San Francisco last summer, when the mayor and the supervisors approved a budget deal that didn't involve any real structural reform, didn't solve any long-term problems, and didn't even last six months.

Now there's a new crisis, one that, if anything, is worse. Cutting almost a half-billion dollars from the city budget last year was absolutely brutal. Read more »

Fixing police discipline

If Chief Gascón is serious about weeding out problem cops, he'd be the first chief in decades to do so.
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EDITORIAL San Francisco's new police chief wants more authority to discipline problem officers. He's been talking about it since the day he arrived, and he's getting some political traction. Sup. David Chiu has called for a hearing in the next few weeks, and it's likely that the chief will seek a Charter Amendment next year to redefine how the top cop and Police Commission handle personnel issues.

We have no problem giving the chief the right to fire a bad cop. Read more »