Labor

SEIU Local 1021 backs motorist measure and a Republican. WTF?!?!

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Service Employees International Union Local 1021 — which has long played an important role in San Francisco’s progressive movement, providing the money and member turnout to achieve some important victories for the left — finds itself at odds with many progressive activists in this election, particularly on the issue of transportation.Read more »

Reform BART's approach to labor

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By Christina Olague

OPINION If BART is part of your daily commute, you know how critical a reliable system is to Bay Area working people. If you don't ride BART, all you have to do it think about all the cars that the system keeps off the road every day.Read more »

Golden Gate Bridge strikes won't effect commuters...yet

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Golden Gate Bridge iron workers are on strike today [Tues/16], protesting retiree healthcare issues their union says were not addressed in 2012. Commuters will not be affected during the strike, however. Machinists Local 1414 made that choice consciously, its representative told us. Read more »

Reinstate the 42: SF protest in solidarity with Brazilian transit workers

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Hey there, lovers and haters of the World Cup, if you missed out on the protest of Google and FIFA at Pride, there’s still time on the clock to score that goal: there will be another protest tomorrow [Thu/3] to support Brazilian transit workers and their quest for higher wages.Read more »

Workers’ new website demands: Hey, Tech, do better

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Can Silicon Valley tech companies “do better?” With the launch of a new website, the tech industry's security guards are coming forward with tales of inequality in Silicon Valley, and asking Google and other big tech companies to do just that.Read more »

Streetcar standoff

Muni sickout echoes earlier labor clashes and economic inequities

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joe@sfbg.com

San Francisco's municipal transportation system stood still, stranding middle class riders. Riots raged throughout the city as over 1,500 streetcar drivers, known as carmen, literally fought with bottles and stones for higher wages. Left with few options, stranded San Franciscans took to other means to get to work: by foot, by bicycle, and by horse-drawn carriage.Read more »

Cristina Lopez, East Bay Recycler

Recycling workers, in their own words

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"I first applied for a job at the Select agency in 2000. A lot of people had told me that this job was really bad. At first they put me on the cardboard line. That didn't seem so bad because it's not so dirty. It's just that the cardboard stacks up so fast. But then they put me on the trash line, which was a lot dirtier. But the thing is, I needed the job. So I worked hard, and the years passed, and I was still there.Read more »

Luis Valladares, East Bay recycler

Recycling workers, in their own words

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"My father is a farmer in Chiapas, and grows corn, mangoes, and bananas. Our land wasn't enough to support our family, though. The little we were able to grow was just to eat.

"When I was 16 I left home and school, and went to Mexico City. Parents never want their children to leave. But we ... can't stay. The majority of young people in my town have left, like me, looking for a way to help their families survive.Read more »

Invisible no more

Threatened with deportation and paid illegally low wages, East Bay recycling workers did the unthinkable: They fought back.
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We all want to be responsible for our environment. We sort our trash. We put the right things into the right containers, and feel good when we see them at the curb on trash pickup day.

Then the trash disappears. End of story.

But really, it's not the end. Not only does the trash go somewhere, but people still have to sort through what we've thrown away. In a society full of people doing work that's unacknowledged, and often out of sight, those who deal with our recycled trash are some of the most invisible of all.Read more »

Photo Gallery: May Day on the Streets of SF

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