Sundance Film Festival

The spectacular docs of Sundance and Slamdance 2014

|
(0)

Hilla Medalia and Shosh Shlam's Web Junkie (Israel-China-US) is an eye-opening investigation into China's declared number-one threat against youth: internet addiction. The doc observes as kids are sent (often against their will) to video-game rehab — and the takeaway is that many generation-gapped parents are even more clueless about emotions than their sons.

Read more »

Sundance, part 11: Celebrating the 20th annual Native Forum

|
(1)

The current second-generation movement of Native/Indigenous filmmakers took the spotlight at the Sundance Film Festival's celebration of the 20th anniversary of its annual Native Forum. 

The event gathered some of the most important figures from around the world to not only screen their most recent films but to share artistic works that inspired them to become filmmakers themselves. Sundance favorite Taika Waitita — a self-proclaimed "Academy Award-losing filmmaker" for his 2005 short Two Cars, One Night, he's best-known for his wonderfully quirky 2007 film Eagle vs. Shark — read a sequence from Andrei Tarkovsky's Stalker (1979), while his vampire comedy What We Do in the Shadows (co-directed with Flight of the Conchords' Jermaine Clement) enraptured Midnight Movie audiences at the 2014 festival. 

Read more »

Sundance part 10: Happy Valentine's Day!

|
(0)

Four memorable movies about frisky females from the 2014 Sundance Film Festival

1) Desiree Akhavan wrote, directed, and stars (with deadpan aplomb) in Appropriate Behavior (US/UK), a tremendously personal story about growing up as a bisexual woman in a Persian family in New York. 

Read more »

Sundance, part nine: Foodies! Vampires! Kill! Kill!

|
(0)

Miss any earlier Sundance coverage? Scroll down right here on Pixel Vision.

Blind (Norway/Netherlands) is the directorial debut of Eskil Vogt, screenwriter of Joachim Trier's Reprise (2006) and Oslo, August 31st (2012). It does not disappoint, and — appropriately enough, considering its writer-director's background — it won the World Cinema Prize for Screenwriting.

Read more »

Sundance, part eight: a quickie, for Leos Carax lovers

|
(1)

Tessa Louise-Salame's ode to France's punk-rock filmmaker Mr. leos caraX (France), or simply Mr. X,  traces his 30 year career while also showcasing Denis Lavant, who stars in all five of his feature films.

Read more »

Sundance, part seven: What is a BABADOOK?

|
(0)

A quick tip for today's entry: make sure not to miss Jennifer Kent's hair-raising, toe-squinching, and all-around terrifying Australian horror film, The Babadook.

Read more »

Sundance, part six: superlatives

|
(0)

More Sundance right here on Pixel Vision.

My biggest excitement of Sundance 2014 was the random email I received asking if I would be able to attend a "super-secret screening of a highly anticipated film by a major filmmaker." (Answer: DUH.) The packed house at Park City's defining Main Street theater, the Egyptian, had no clue what film was to be screened, though many thought it might be Wes Anderson's The Grand Budapest Hotel.

In fact, turned out to be the premiere of Lars von Trier's Nymphomaniac: Part One (Denmark/Germany/France) which is rated NC-17 (look for its theatrical release on March 21, or catch it On Demand starting March 6). Nymphomaniac: Part Two will follow shortly afterward, with a VOD debut on April 3 and a theatrical release on April 18.

Read more »

Sundance, part five: Swanberg + Ross Perry

|
(1)

Missed a previous Sundance post? Check out Pixel Vision for more.

Director and sometimes actor Joe Swanberg is a household name among South by Southwest fest-goers (and mumblecore fans everywhere), with such gems as Nights and Weekends (2009), Marriage Material (2012), All the Light in the Sky (2012), and his segment in V/H/S (2012) entitled "The Sick Thing That Happened to Emily When She Was Younger." 

Read more »

Sundance, part four: indie heroes and genre flicks

|
(3)

Missed yesterday's Sundance installment? Right this way!

In Ira Sachs' Love Is Strange (US), Ben (John Lithgow) and George (Alfred Molina) — together for 39 years — are finally married, and suddenly find themselves having to deal with the fallout from an ill-considered world. Both actors are pitch-perfect at portraying longtime lovers, and Marisa Tomei has an intelligent supporting role as a relative of the couple. 

Sundance favorite Sachs (2012's Keep the Lights On), who debuted with the shockingly memorable The Delta in 1996, treats the material with finesse, and the end result is genuinely earned heartache (and, likely, will yield serious crossover potential). It's a cliche, but true: at the screening I attended, there was not a dry eye in the house. 

Read more »

Sundance, part three: diamonds in the rough

|
(1)

Missed out on last week's Sundance glee? Part one here; part two here

Malik Vittal's Imperial Dreams (US) won the Audience Award in the NEXT category, created for films that stretch limited resources to create impactful art. John Boyega (from 2011's Attack the Block) delivers another complicated and hypnotic performance as a young father trying to make good in the 'hood. In this spot-on throwback to powerful, low-budget urban films — think the Hughes Brothers' Menace II Society (1991) and Spike Lee's Clockers (1995), and even back to Ulu Grosbard's Straight Time (1978) — director Vittal coaxes some spectacular acting moments, not just from Boyega but also his forlorn friends, played by De'aundre Bonds and R&B singer Rotimi. You don't want to miss this little treasure.

Read more »