Lou Reed's not so perfect day

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(72)
Lou Reed
nypost.com

Last Friday, it was revealed that Velvet Underground co-founder and occasionally proclaimed "godfather of punk rock" Lou Reed had undergone a life-saving liver transplant in Cleveland. Reed, 71 was "dying" according to his third wife, Laurie Anderson. She says that Reed is already improving and up and around doing tai chi, but that "he will never be completely better''.

Given that Reed is in his eighth decade on the planet and is notorious for drug-related anthems like "Heroin", "Waiting For The Man" and "White Light/White Heat", there is a pushback of a sort. Why would this elderly reprobate, surely the cause of his own misery get leap-frogged ahead of a younger person. Someone more deserving.

This kind of ridiculous moral posturing and shrill self-righteousness is at the heart of every argument when anyone with a self-inflicted ailment seeks treatment. First of all, Reed's liver failed from complications from Hepatitis C. Like many intravenous drug users, he had no idea this existed when he was using--no excuse you say? He should have known better--how? And that if he'd only lived an ascetic existence, this never would have happened? Reed has been intermittedly sober for almost 30 years as documented on his album "The Blue Mask". Secondly, that he's 71, why "waste" an organ on him? 

Because he's ill. Just as you'd wish a measure like that would be taken if you had made it to 71 and had loved ones. The idea that a chronic smoker shouldn't get a lung, or an obese person a lapband because they'd brought this onto themselves and were now too old to benefit--that's a rather strangely "anti-life'' attitude.

Yeah, it isn't fair that Reed or David Crosby, Mickey Mantle or Phil Lesh got priorities for a new liver having run the old one down to nothing (which is quite a feat, as Cedars' liver expert John Vierling told me years ago, the liver is the body's strongest organ). Especially when there are younger people whose livers didn't fail from abuse but from organic causes. But the afore-mentioned have something in common--they're wealthy. Perhaps if the financial issue weren't part of it and it was a "liver lottery" and paid for by Medicare, this would be "fairer". But as long as moral scoldery and the adoration of the "free market" seem to be on the same (right) side of the political coin, fat chance.

I'm happy for Lou and Laurie. Lou's songs are among my favorites and anyone that nay-says his skill because it's simple music sung by someone with a limited vocal range can pound sand. Long may he run.

 

Comments

My issue has been and always will be the fact that the wealthy get to leap frog to the top of the line, while so many actually DIE on the organ lottery system. Why? Because we have a completely stupid system that allows so many organs to go to the grave. We need an "opt out" system, not an "opt in" system. If you want to take your organs to your grave, then you have to put it in writing. If not, once your family members have cried over your corpse, it will be salvaged. The families will not know the difference, as morticians are fantastic at making cadavers look funeral presentable. Asking family members at the absolute worst time of their lives if you can harvest organs is just stupid. They are going to react emotionally, not logically. And most people don't even want to THINK of death, let alone talk about what to do with their spare parts after their gone. The thought of organs going into the grave or being cremated is just horrifying, when they can help so many people. We should also allow HIV positive organs to be transplanted into other HIV positive organ candidates. This has been a controversial procedure that has been banned solely out of political fears and not out of science.

Posted by klmchale on Jun. 02, 2013 @ 1:24 pm

I believe there are actually many strains of HIV, as viruses mutate much easier than bacteria, and other cell (except cancer), when someone has multiple strains their body/ cells are just not as receptive to treatments. Organ transplants are extremely taxing on the body even w/ out such a chronic illness, that it can often be more painful to endure the transplant that to just pass away in peace. I'm not a doctor, not authority in this subject.

Posted by Guest on Nov. 03, 2013 @ 12:41 pm

Is it - as far as I know - Illegal - to win an organ based on finances.... if it is not still illegal- it sure as hell should be.
If its not- why not just support the organ thieves that kidnap healthy young POOR people off the streets in third world countries - hacking them to bits and selling the usable organs on the black market????????
If you are going to buy an organ - they have to come from somewhere -so who really cares if a poor person half a world away has to die to make that happen????
I have never been a big Lou Reed fan...... "limited vocal range" is being VERY polite- and his taking a healthy organ off the market that could have gone to someone young who could make a contribution to our society in the future is one of the more disgusting things I have ever heard of.
What about accepting responsibilities for your actions? Even if he didn't know about Hep C.... shouldn't Lou have to deal with the consequences of spending decades injecting drugs into his veins? And the fact that he glamourized it to the point it influenced THOUSANDS of musicians who wanted to follow in his footsteps to do the same thing should have F&*(ED his karma enough that a suitable match was not available- but it was......... I understand how some would say "Lou is dying- let him get a new liver"..... and I do not wish death on anyone... but if I had to choose between Lou Reed and a younger person with a family- or a young adult/teen who would have also been a match for that same organ..... Lou would be on his way to pushing up daisies...........

Posted by Guest on Jun. 02, 2013 @ 1:32 pm

They begin and end with him.

I never drank or took drugs because a singer "glamorized" them. I liked them.

Anyone that emulates a pop star's bad habits cannot blame said star anymore than they can religion, lack of love or anything else. We're responsible for ourselves.

Posted by JohnnyW on Jun. 02, 2013 @ 1:40 pm

When you start moralizing organ transplant, then very few people will be allowed to get an organ. Only children and some teens and very few adults will be allowed an organ if we go with the moral application. A large portion of organ transplant comes from unhealthy lifestyle and the criteria will get even more narrow if we start moralizing. And I say this as someone who's father died of the same disease that Dick Cheney has. It sickens me that that old bastard has been kept alive, on the taxpayer's dime and received the creme de la creme of health care that only the very rich and connected can receive and my dear dad died, even with insurance. They are even the same age. My dad was never even considered for transplant and Cheney not only got a transplant was kept alive with L-VAD, which is very expensive, until a heart came available.

Posted by klmchale on Jun. 02, 2013 @ 2:00 pm

How about Lou's kids? Do they get a say? How about his parents (who i think are still alive)? Do they count here, as someone who might want to keep Lou alive? His wife, himself, the millions of fans worldwide? For a man who other than this liver, has been putting out excellent rock and roll even recently? How about all the musicians he has helped along the way? All the people he has made smile or laugh, or dance, or influence to pick up a guitar or write a song? There are thousands, maybe millions, but that doesn't pass your sanctimonious angle does it? The point is, your argument has foggy vision, and unless you are a God, you cannot make this decision. I respect your opinion, or at least your right to express it, but I think you are off base here. I certainly agree that the fates of those who need organs shouldn't come down to a bank account, but we do live in the world of money, money, money.
Go listen to "New York", an absolutely brilliant album.

Posted by Guest on Jun. 02, 2013 @ 4:36 pm

Parents are most likely deceased--he is 71!

Posted by JohnnyW on Jun. 02, 2013 @ 8:57 pm

He does, his mother is alive

Posted by Guest on Nov. 13, 2013 @ 3:03 am

I don't believe he has any children, at least in the biological sense.

Posted by Guest on Nov. 03, 2013 @ 12:48 pm

Wish I could say I believe that finances and /or politics don't come into play when it comes to who receives a life-saving organ but I don't.

Posted by Guest on Mar. 22, 2014 @ 12:23 am

I guess that's why people like to have it, you think?

Posted by Guest on Mar. 22, 2014 @ 4:43 am

You tell 'em, Johnny!

How could anyone in the '70's have figured out that speed was bad for you?

Posted by Jim on Jun. 02, 2013 @ 5:56 pm

Piece of shit.

Lou Reed, RIP, bro.

Posted by matlock on Jun. 02, 2013 @ 7:24 pm

Your work has been exemplary so far, but on all this punk talk... first Sonny Bono -- which seemed almost like it might have been a subtle dig... and now Lou Reed... How about John Cale?

I'm afraid something has gone wrong on the business front and now you're bucking for a severance package. Is this a cry for help? Damn.

Anyhow, best wishes to Lou and hoping for more musical genius. Candy Says is the most amazing song he ever wrote How do all those many chords go together like that?

Posted by lillipublicans on Jun. 03, 2013 @ 2:12 am

I'm afrail lillipublicans just doesn't get it.

"I'm fraid something has gone wrong on the business front and now you're bucking for a severance package. Is this a cry for help? Damn."

Johnny Angel has been a shot-in-the-arm to the SFBG blog.

And SFBG DOES NOT do severance packages.

Posted by Burt on Jun. 03, 2013 @ 6:33 am

how much output and commentary it is possible for a single correspondent can deliver in a working day.

As such, it makes you wonder what Tim and Steven are doing all day long, as they manage only a small fraction of JAW's output?

Posted by Guest on Jun. 03, 2013 @ 6:46 am

Dreamy Johnny is the Energizer Bunny of left-wing blogging!

Posted by Lance on Jun. 03, 2013 @ 7:30 am

Oh ya. I'm sure he had no clue that SHOOTING HEROIN UP in your veins was bad for you. DUH. You've got to be brain dead if you would do that thinking there will be no repercussions. You make it sound like he was doing this in the early 1900's. by the time the 1960's rolled around, Heroin was already WELL DOCUMENTED. I don't care if the actual cause was Hepatitis A; if it wasn't Hepatitis, it SURELY would be one of the numerous other ails that accompany heroin use. I like Lou Reed's music but stop giving morons a free pass. That is what is wrong with society: making the person standing up straight bend down to accommodate people who don't want to stand up, instead of people who r bending down to rise up to the rest of our level. Pathetic

Posted by Joe on Jun. 03, 2013 @ 11:56 am

"That is what is wrong with society: making the person standing up straight bend down to accommodate people who don't want to stand up, instead of people who r bending down to rise up to the rest of our level."

No, what's "wrong with society" is the self-righteous chest puffing everytime a "vice" makes someone ill.

Reed is a sick man and got treatment. That his past was dragged into it is absurd--by this logic, no obese person, smoker, person with rage issues, any addiction of any kind--should be treated. No one that got HIV or an STD, no one that drove drunk and hit a pole, no one that binges on sugar and gets onset diabetes--should be treated.

Treat one, you treat 'em all. 

Posted by JohnnyW on Jun. 03, 2013 @ 12:11 pm

I've always had trouble understanding why every drug reference in a song is construed as promoting said drug(s)..All the junkies I knew thought Lou's "Heroin" was saying to them "Yeah, get yourself a heroin habit ,it's great, it's better than everything else you could be doing". To me even as a teenager it was saying the opposite. I always found it a scary song that kept me away from trying it even when opportunities presented themselves. I had no desire to become a listless apathetic criminal bag of shit and couldn't understand why anyone would think they were being applauded for becoming one. I tried it exactly twice when I was pushing 30, now know what it's like and will never do it again though the experience wasn't adverse. I used to sit around with druggies listening to Frank Zappa & the Mothers of Invention who didn't get the fact that Frank was laughing at them, they thought he was promoting drugs and he was renowned as a nonuser, that was pretty funny too.I sat around with a junkie kid from my hometown once who was drinking and getting drunk while Waiting For The Man the customary 5 or 6 hours to bring him the junk; when he finally got it he was drunk,spilled it on the floor, and I watched him scoop it up with all the dirt & crud from the kitchen floor and cook it up and shoot up, and said "blecch...." But Lou's a great artist,and great art and works have been created by addicted people over the centuries,the question is whether any greatness in the works was caused by or was in spite of the drink/drugs....I have known two people who have had liver transplants who were not wealthy celebs, one was a shameless drunk, the other wasn't.The nondrunk got about 8 years out of her new liver, then it started to fail also, these transplanted organs are not meant to last forever...by then she knew she would be low on the list for another,then being over 60,she's deceased now.I do believe one organ per lifetime for an older person is probably enough.

Posted by Jane E. L. on Jun. 03, 2013 @ 2:53 pm

"To me even as a teenager it was saying the opposite. I always found it a scary song that kept me away from trying it even when opportunities presented themselves."

Wha?

Why would anyone think that the following lyrics were scary?

"Heroin, be the death of me
Heroin, it's my wife and it's my life
Because a needle to my vein
Leads to a center in my head
And then I'm better off dead"

Drugz are kewl, man!

Posted by Rob on Jun. 03, 2013 @ 3:09 pm

Rob, back at that young & stoopid age I actually did think some drugs were pretty cool, just not THAT drug!

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Hello my good friends please do not see this strange cause it my life story about my healing, i was having HIV for good 6yrs. Things were not working fine for me due to my health status i know longer have friends know lover it even takes time before my family co-operate with me due to this i tried all possible means i can to get this devilish sickness out of my body i went to hospitals churches and other heath organization but all remains the same till yet i never gave up cos i was not born with this illness so i decided to take it over to the internet to see if i could get remedy, on my search i saw a testimony of a woman, she said she was also having a terrible sickness for over 3yrs but now she is healed i was surprise at first when i saw her test so she wrote a name Dr Molemen and also gave his email id so i mailed them which is (drmolemenspiritualtemple@gmail.com) i told them about my problem and after the processes he told me that am healed but i never believed he told me to go and confirm it from the hospital were i have been taking treatment still i never believed also although he gave me evidence that the sickness was gone.
Finally i decided to go for check up and to my surprise my doctor said the sickness was know longer there with thought of joy i started shearing tears.
My friends today am now married bless with 2kids, so if you have any sickness kindly email (drmolemenspiritualtemple@gmail.com) or call him on (+2347036013351)sir i will forever remain in you debt.
Thank you sir am grateful

Posted by Philo on Apr. 08, 2014 @ 12:01 am

correction: after the debacle with #7, celebs aren't allowed to jump to the head of the line. in order to get a new liver, you need documented sobriety.

it sounds like lou's acute morbidity made him a priority candidate.

Posted by Guest on Jul. 24, 2013 @ 11:01 am

Listening to all the perfectionists on here about the mistakes Lou made in his younger years makes me sick, Lou was a great man who spent the last 30 years of his physically suffering life living clean from substances and living with the consequence's of his active addiction, he deserved a transplant and and respected his life,

He' s a human being who made mistakes.
RIP

Posted by Guest bomber on Oct. 27, 2013 @ 3:26 pm

Lot's of interesting discussion surrounding the ethics of this person's transplant
I think Hep C is a fairly common indication for transplant
And yeah, he probably got some deference from a place like the Cleveland Clinic

Where was all the discussion about Steve Jobs?
At least this transplant was for a real indication.
Jobs was transplanted purely out of his own stupidity
And I don't think metastatic cancer is on any list for indications for transplant

Posted by Guest on Oct. 27, 2013 @ 4:58 pm

OK
That's unfair
Jobs wasn't stupid
Completely arrogant is likely correct
Perhaps absolutely rather than completely
That was a wasted organ, paid for with cash

Posted by Guest on Oct. 27, 2013 @ 5:17 pm

Agreed 100%

Posted by Jim Southall on Mar. 22, 2014 @ 12:29 am

My father was not a rock star. He is, however, a recovered heroin addict and certainly lived the fast life much like a rock star. He was plagued and continues to be haunted by childhood traumas. Just like Lou Reed, he contracted Hep C from intravenous drug use. Drug addicts are completely out of their body, they are weak, suffering souls they are not considering the harmful detriment they are doing to themselves. They need the next fix and that is about all they can possibly comprehend. Just as any addict whether it be drugs, alcohol, food, money, sugar there is an underlying problem and unless you have a strong mind-body connection NOTHING is going to stop you from the vicious cycle. So, for some people to make these blanket statements about how he should have known what he was doing and blah blah blah is completely absurd.

And as far as the ridiculous ASSUMPTION he received a transplant because he was wealthy and/or famous is completely unfounded. My father was dying waiting for a transplant for over 2 years and as luck would have it he finally had a donor. My family is not wealthy nor is my father famous. It is an arduous process. There are series of mental and physical tests that the recipient must pass in order to be a candidate. It is based on a MELD score not the amount of $$$$ in your bank account. The higher your score the more dire your circumstance. Lou Reed received the donor organ because he was on the list and was dying. People should not be so judgmental without knowing ALL the circumstances. He could have been on that list for 5 years. So please before you start condemning people for the mistakes they have made in their lives, which they more than likely already hate themselves for, take some time to instead be kind and compassionate.

Thank you from a former heroin addicts daughter

Posted by Guest on Oct. 27, 2013 @ 5:15 pm

My wife was listed at CC for over 4 years, recently was told she was being de-listed. I wish I shared your belief that the system isn't seriously flawed.

Posted by Jim Southall on Mar. 22, 2014 @ 12:37 am

My father was not a rock star. He is, however, a recovered heroin addict and certainly lived the fast life much like a rock star. He was plagued and continues to be haunted by childhood traumas. Just like Lou Reed, he contracted Hep C from intravenous drug use. Drug addicts are completely out of their body, they are weak, suffering souls they are not considering the harmful detriment they are doing to themselves. They need the next fix and that is about all they can possibly comprehend. Just as any addict whether it be drugs, alcohol, food, money, sex there is an underlying problem and unless you have a strong mind-body connection NOTHING is going to stop you from the vicious cycle. So, for some people to make these blanket statements about how drugs addicts should know the harm they cause to their bodies and blah blah blah is completely absurd.

And as far as the ridiculous ASSUMPTION he received a transplant because he was wealthy and/or famous is completely unfounded. My father was dying waiting for a transplant for over 2 years and as luck would have it he finally had a donor. My family is not wealthy nor is my father famous. It is an arduous process. There is a series of mental and physical tests that the recipient must pass in order to be a candidate. It is based on a MELD score not the amount of $$$$ in your bank account. The higher your score the more dire your circumstance. Lou Reed received the donor organ because he was on the list and was dying. People should not be so judgmental without knowing ALL the circumstances. He could have been on that list for 5 years. Not to mention that he was treated in Cleveland but lived in NY. The lists vary from state to state. You can get on another states list IF and ONLY if you can make it to the hospital within a certain amount of time. Lou Reed had the means to be transported to Cleveland. Guess what, my father lives in Nevada but received the donor in CA. So please before you start condemning people for the mistakes they have made in their lives, which they more than likely already hate themselves for, take some time to instead be kind and compassionate.

Thank you from a former heroin addicts daughter

Posted by Guest on Oct. 27, 2013 @ 5:24 pm

Ironic?

Posted by Guest on Oct. 27, 2013 @ 5:26 pm

Wasn't he in his seventh decade rather being him 71?

Posted by Luz del Fuego on Oct. 27, 2013 @ 11:17 pm

During ones first decade of life, one goes from birth to being one year old

Posted by Guest on Oct. 28, 2013 @ 3:06 am

I lost my husband to Hep C in 2009. He was not a rock star. He was not a derelict. He was an incredibly intelligent, hard-working man who had an enviable career and who provided for his family.

He was, however, a babyboomer. He, like tens of thousands of other babyboomers, grew up in a rock n' roll era, where life had, ironically, an innocence about it. When he was diagnosed with a liver issue in 1988, hep c was not even "invented" yet. His liver enzymes (among other factors) were out of normal range, and was part of the very first pharmaceutical interferon trial for, what was then called, hepatitis non-A none-B. It did not work, as was the case for more than 60% of patients at that time.

The next 20+ years of his life were dedicated to healing - through spirituality, nutrition, alternative medicine, etc. His liver functions, during this time, were in a "normal" range, while the viral load was also tolerable.

Hepatitis C is a stealth virus that can live in one's system for 20+ years undetected. My husband was asymptomatic until 2 years before his death, when the damage to his liver had compromised its functions. That's when the downward spiral began.

He had admitted to social drinking that year. Because this was on his record, he was required by the National Organ Donor organization to undergo substance abuse conselling. Here's the little known story about the unfairness and inconsistency in the liver transplant world....

One transplant center said to come back after a year of counselling (even though it didn't take a doctor to determine that, due to his condition, he didn't have a year
left. A second center told us they would put him on a list after 2 weeks of counselling. If his "abuse problem" was so dire, how could 2 very well respected university hospitals have 2 dramatically different prognoses?????

We were eager to comply - to save his life. Two days after being told he could get the work done in 2 weeks, he slipped into a coma. He pulled out of the coma, and I had arranged for a substance abuse counselor to treat him bedside, in the hospital. In the meantime, I was begging the second hospital to give him the transplant, promising that we would continue conselling as soon as the surgery was done.

They let him die.

All this is to say that, liver transplants have nothing to do with how much money is available to the patient. They have everything to do with an inconsistent, inhumane system that judges a human for choice made decades before, with no compassion or support for one's will to change.

Posted by Adrienne Crowther on Oct. 28, 2013 @ 5:59 am

Yeah, you got to live, yeah, your life
as though you're number one
Yeah, you got to live, yeah, your life
and make a point of having some fun

Posted by marcos on Oct. 28, 2013 @ 7:25 am

Fortunately, but not in time enough for Lou Reed, the upside of HIV HAART research has been a revolution in Hep C treatment. Within a year or two, there should be all oral regimens with fewer side effects than the oral component of the traditional regimen, Ribivirin. Interferon will be a thing of the past for most all people with Hep C.

The cure rates for some genotypes with these new classes of meds are north of 90%.

Posted by marcos on Oct. 28, 2013 @ 7:29 am

if you are unfamiliar with the album "Loaded" do yourself a favor and track it down.

One of the truly great rock-n-roll albums

"he started dancing to that fine, fine music, his life was saved by rock and roll..."

Posted by DanO on Oct. 28, 2013 @ 9:30 am

Ok first of all it would be very hard to pay off someone to put you at the top of the list. If you are the sickest person, you have the highest meld score (which is a formula of Kidney function/failure=Creatinine/Bilirubin and Albumin) and then you are at the top of the list. You are dealing with a reputable organization, not just a Dr or individual. You are also dealing with teams of people, specialists and professionals.

You can't just waltz in when you get cirrhosis and plop a million down to get listed. There is a specific formula. There are rules with UNOS.org. You can't just say I'll pay for one.

When My husband was #1 in nation and dropped to #2, I said to myself, Who could really be in worse condition then my husband? Who's liver and kidneys had failed, he no longer coagulated blood and was hours from dying.
BUT ,Yes, money plays a part, but only to reassure that payment will be made after procurring a liver. A liver transplant costs over $600,000- 1 Mil. At least not in the U.S.-perhaps in other countries you can buy a liver.

It used to be that if you got on a waiting list first, you would be next. Now it works with who is the sickest in the region then out-reaching the nation. And yes, many of these famous and rich persons can afford treatment in the best hospitals, with the best physicians. We had good insurance when my husband got his Liver transplant and we were fortunate. Not having funds to pay for a transplant can be risky. Free pro-bono transplants? I don't think so. They have some funding set up to help with that, but even Medicare doesnt cover these costs.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 28, 2013 @ 1:50 pm

Thank you so much for your clear and concise layout of the situation. I had a liver transplant 10 years ago and it is still working, (knock on wood). Over the years I have educated myself about the issues facing people in this nation regarding transplants. Is there subjectivity in the process? Yes , there is. I was transplanted at the University of Colorado Hospital in Denver, another one of the leading liver transplant hospitals in the country.
For those of you that think this can be done by picking up a phone and ordering a liver, let me educate you - Heres is how it worked: I had to be evaluated and go through a series of tests to let the doctors, nurses, social workers and psychologists can decide if I was a good candidate. Then, once a week, on Thursdays (at least when I went through the process), they all met and determined if I was a good candidate. What that meant was, did my tests and my mental and physical well-being indicate that I would benefit from the transplant and would I take care of it once I got it. After I was put on the list, I was then assigned a number. At that point, NOBODY knew what my name or my situation was. They looked at one thing and one thing only: my health. They looked at something called a MELD score, which is a score given to each patient based on their tests. The higher the MELD score, the sicker you are. All of this being done with numbers, not names. When a liver was procured, they would look at person (again, no name, just a number) and determine if the liver would work for that person. There is a multitude of things that have to match for a liver to be compatible, such as blood type, rh factor, other tests involved in the MELD score and then also things such as valve size and placement. If one of these things is off, then there is no match and they look at the next person. YOU CAN"T BUY A LIVER THAT WAY! If you do, you will most likely end up dying because it won't match! So, if it isn't a match for number 1 they go to number 2 and so forth. And of course, ability to pay plays into it. I like, "Liver Leap froggings" husband had great insurance and the ability to pay the left over amount which was an exorbitant amount. Determining whether I was financially capable was done before I was allowed to be listed. If you or your insurance doesn't pay for it, then the patient has to come up with the money before the transplant will happen. So, no money, no list. Is that wrong? Of course it is! I would have to be an idiot to say that the system is fair. It most certainly isn't. As a matter of fact, I am very lucky that I will be able to get health insurance again because I am almost at my million dollar life time benefit amount. Being sick in the USA is an incredibly costly matter. It has bankrupted many people. There are many other people that it doesn't bankrupt. But to say that those people somehow "cheated" or "lied" to get a liver is absurd. 88% of the people in this country who get liver transplants are ill because of one of these "self-imposed" illnesses. This is not about the wealthy being able to leap frog, they can't. This is about a country that doesn't give a damn about making sure that anyone and everyone can afford the same kind of medical care.

Posted by Guest on Nov. 02, 2013 @ 3:52 pm

If we're going to say that someone doesn't deserve transplant because of risky behavior, where does that end?

Are we going to say that someone who is obese doesn't get a transplant because they ate too many cheeseburgers?

Posted by Rick on Nov. 14, 2013 @ 10:38 am

Actually, obese people aren't allowed on the kidney transplant list unless they lose the required weight. So your argument is incorrect.

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HERE AM I TODAY FREE FROM THAT BONDAGE, THANK YOU DR. CAFI FOR OUR HELP

Posted by Blaze on Feb. 01, 2014 @ 3:27 am

The guy died. How many months did he live with that liver which could have gone to someone (not famous) who would still be alive?

Posted by Guest on Feb. 16, 2014 @ 1:12 pm

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